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The Mind/Body Connection

The Mind/Body Connection

When I was young our family used to love to go to Katepwa Lake for holidays. My uncle had a beautiful boat with a sixty-horsepower motor and all my cousins enjoyed water skiing behind it. The problem was that no matter how hard I tried, I couldn’t seem to get up out of the water!

I remember the morning of my nineth birthday. The sun was shining, and the water was as smooth as glass. First thing I asked my uncle if I could try once again to ski. He agreed.

After carefully tying on the life jacket, I got into the shallow water and manipulated the long skis. Then I curled up into the ball and yelled “Hit it”. 

The boat began tugging at my rope and I felt like my arms were going to be pulled from their sockets. I managed to roll up into a standing position and was so excited. I was skiing!

My arms were hurting, and my feet were trying so hard to keep the skis in position. It was exhalating but, at the same time frightening.

I was scared to hold on and scared to let go.

Many times, throughout life we have similar experiences. We want to do something, but our bodies and emotions interfere. Even when we are well on the way to success our fears can prevent us from getting there.

Over the next few days of my ninth year, my uncle was kind enough to let me practice skiing over and over again. My confidence increased and the pain decreased as I developed the skills that all skiers require.

It wasn’t long until my two cousins and I could actually triple ski with three ropes of different lengths that allowed us to move in and out over the wake while changing positions. 

I don’t ski anymore but the lessons that I learned that summer have stayed with me.

Learning something new can be scary. We need people into support and encourage us as we try to develop new skills. Our bodies and emotions are often unprepared for the task, so we need practice to improve in order to become proficient and reach the goal. 

Even more importantly than just being successful is the fact that we can develop strength and wisdom from going through the process!

What are you wanting to accomplish? Are you brave enough to challenge both your body and your emotions to reach that goal? Do you have people who will support you during the process?


Here’s to new goals and success!

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About the Author

Dr. Hancock has written a regular weekly column entitled “All Psyched Up” for newspapers in two Canadian provinces for more than a dozen years...