Employer Integrity

Dr. Linda Hancock 03. The Third Year Business Business_And More iStock


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Common sense isn’t all that common anymore – and it doesn’t make sense to everyone.

Perhaps because we live in a world that is constantly changing and becoming more competitive, it is more difficult to stick to what we used to think were the “basics” in business

I am always pleased to hear individuals talk about the things that make their work experience a positive one.  Employers who have the best reputations usually are consistent in their commitment to specific principles:

  1. Ensure that your employees know what is expected of them. Have up-to-date Job Descriptions and communicate clearly and regularly through clear verbal and written messages.
  2. Provide a safe and healthy environment for staff. Consider the “worst case scenario” and then change procedures or equipment to alleviate the problems.  Train staff specifically on how to deal with any unforeseen risks.
  3. Pay the employees on time and in the contracted amount. Provide the benefits that you promised them without deviation.
  4. Address concerns immediately and outline a plan to help the employee improve.
  5. Pay your bills on time. Employees, vendors and financiers become “nervous” when debts pile up.
  6. Listen to your employees. Often the best ideas for improving procedures come from those who are doing the work.
  7. Be consistent. Employees tend to compare the treatment others are given and become resentful when there are discrepancies.
  8. Set an example for others. Be on time, answer your messages in a timely fashion and display ethics that you want to promote.
  9. Encourage and thank others. A few words of kindness can go a long way in another person’s life.
  10. Be the employer you would love to have. Whenever I ask employees to tell me about the “best boss” they have had, they smile.  They use words such as “compassionate”, “forgiving”, “kind”, “patient”, or helpful.  They always focus on the “being” characteristics rather than the performance or “doing” characteristics.  For example, I have heard accounts described as “gentle” but not as “someone who could do three Income Tax Returns in a day.

The demands of the world of work are similar to the Olympics.  We are expected to do “faster, higher, stronger” performances and that isn’t easy

If you would like to be an employer who is a treasured mentor to others, you may find that meeting with a Registered Psychologist will help you to achieve that goal.


Dr. Linda Hancock, the author of “Life is An Adventure…every step of the way” and “Open for Business Success” is a Registered Psychologist who has a private practice in Medicine Hat. She can be reached at 403-529-6877 or through email office@drlindahancock.com



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